Home News Electrophysiologists Display a New Technique for Creating Interactive Heart Maps From 12-Lead ECGs

Electrophysiologists Display a New Technique for Creating Interactive Heart Maps From 12-Lead ECGs

Electrophysiologists Display a New Technique for Creating Interactive Heart Maps From 12-Lead ECGs

The University of California San Diego Health has debuted a new technology that may offer a better way to assess and treat arrhythmias such as atrial fibrillation (AFib).

The vMap system is a noninvasive, computational mapping system that produces a 3D, interactive map of arrhythmia hotspots anywhere in the heart. It can pinpoint the source of cardiac rhythm issues in all four chambers of the heart, the septal wall and the outflow tracts. The system creates an electrophysiology (EP) electro map of the heart in minutes using only data from a standard 12-lead electrocardiogram (ECG).

The standard of care for treating AFib is catheter ablation, when specialists burn or freeze specific cardiac tissue responsible for the errant electrical signals causing the abnormal heartbeat. A common issue, however, has been locating these specific areas that need to be treated. Traditional arrhythmia mapping techniques take a lot of time and energy, and physicians are only able to achieve complete success in a limited number of ablation procedures due to the lack of information about arrhythmia source locations. In fact, AFib recurs following catheter ablation in up to 40% of cases.

Mapping the heart prior to the procedure can take more than an hour and is a time consuming part of these procedures. This new technology can create the electoral mapping prior to the procedure, which can aid planning and greatly reduce procedure times.